Farewell to Lucia Bosè | Vogue Italia

The announcement came via Twitter, on Miguel Bosè’s account. “Dear friends, I inform you that my mother is dead and is now in the best possible position”. Lucia Bosè passed away in Madrid, where she lived, on 23 March 2020.

The 89-year-old actress was born in Milan in 1931. After the war, at 16, she participated in the Miss Italy 1947, who wins by defeating also Gina Lollobrigida, who ranks third. The step is short from the beauty pageant to the cinema: in 1950 the first parts arrive as protagonist. Act in There is no peace between the olive trees of Peppe De Santis and in the cult Chronicle of a love by Michelangelo Antonioni.

Her refined and melancholic beauty, combined with a certain aura of mystery, they contribute to making it the muse of many directors of the time, from Luchino Visconti to Antonioni himself who also directs her in La Signora senza Camelie. Lucia Bosè works tirelessly: with Luciano Emmer in The girls of the Spanish Steps (1952), with Mario Soldati in It is love that ruins me, with Francesco Maselli in Gli sbandati. Then Lucia Bosè lands in Spain (The selfish ones, by Bardem) and then in France (The lovers without tomorrow by Luis Bunuel). And it’s in Spain who knows the love of his life: the legendary bullfighter Luis Dominguin who marries in 1956. A love that earns the covers of all the newspapers but that ends badly, despite three children: Miguel, Lucia and Paola.

After the divorce, Lucia returns to the cinema and manages to revivethe. Turn with Fellini (Satyricon), Bolognini (Metello, La certosa di Parma,) with Nelo Risi (The infamous column), Liliana Cavani (The guest), Giulio These (Arcana). After Chronicle of an announced death of 1987 and some other apparitions, he decides to retire.

Vogue remembers her with some portraits from the 50s and 60s, the pinnacle of her sophisticated elegance.

In “Lovers of Tomorrow” by Luis Bunuel, 1956

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The actress on the set in 1949

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In the movie “Lovers of tomorrow”

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In “Tradita”, from 1954

© DEFD / IPA

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