Tomorrow’s business. Interview with Carla Buzasi: Teachers are (Role) Models by Kidsuper

Looking back over the past few years, we have seen a flourishing of young talents with a special focus on sustainable fashion. And perhaps one of the emerging designers who left their mark is Colm Dillane, 28 years old, born in New York, whose mentality that “everything is possible” was the real push towards his success on the catwalk, at the fashion weeks in Paris and New York. The name of his brand (and he alter ego) with an essentially street style, KidSuper maybe won’t say anything to most yet, but Dillane’s eccentric and playful approach and his overwhelming personality on social networks have undoubtedly attracted a large and devoted host of admirers.

Tomorrow's business
Tomorrow’s business

Dillane’s path to becoming a stylist and launching KidSuper it was quite unusual. As a kid he was a rebel, he didn’t want to buy clothes that others considered “cool”, and instead he made them himself. Without ever studying fashion, he started making T-shirts at the age of 15, to sell them in the high school bar. He was later admitted to New York University to study mathematics, which did not stop him from pursuing his dream: to create his own sustainable fashion clothing line. Like so many tech startups that come to light in a garage, KidSuper was born in her room in the college dormitory, which she had even used as a shop. His small business was closed by the principal, who also threatened to throw him out if he continued to break the rules. After that episode, Dillane decided to move and live in Brooklyn in a space where she could sell her clothes freely.

© Tanima Mehrotra and Steven Moran

© Tanima Mehrotra and Steven Moran

© Tanima Mehrotra and Steven Moran

For the last 2020 look-book of KidSuper, which is called Teachers Are (Role) Models, the stylist used teachers as models (including life models): the cooking teacher Kazuo Yoshida, that of diction Susan Salinger, the professor of civil engineering Daniel Wacks, and the principal / coach King Doyle. The styling is by Colm Dillane himself and the photos are by Tanima Mehrotra and Steven Moran. “If we want to get to the essentials, the most important profession is precisely that of the teacher. It is absurd for society to consider them so little and pay them so little, “says Dillane. “I really don’t understand why it is normal in this society to pay very little for teachers and a lot of models. Why brands don’t pay models $ 5, what will happen? There are millions of beautiful people in the world, and honestly the teachers are much cooler when they wear my clothes. I hope I have launched a new trend, and that other brands also choose teachers as models, and pay them a lot, so that they can be even more inspired and enthusiastic when they teach future generations. I wanted to focus on a person’s actions, not on his appearance. At the heart of KidSuper there is a mission: to highlight the superhero inside us, and to present works that stimulate an important debate. “

Today Dillane besides fashion is also interested in art, music and cinema. He shot short films to promote his KidSuper brand and proposed a new series to television networks. And soon he will collaborate with Puma. As Dillane says, “the world is in my hands!”, And it seems that nothing can stop this enfant prodige and its mission: to break with traditional fashion patterns.

© Tanima Mehrotra and Steven Moran

© Tanima Mehrotra and Steven Moran

© Tanima Mehrotra and Steven Moran

© Tanima Mehrotra and Steven Moran

© Tanima Mehrotra and Steven Moran

© Tanima Mehrotra and Steven Moran

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